Living, Dreaming, Dying – Rob Nairn

Free Introduction: Sunday 25 Feb
Tuesday Evenings at 7:30 – 9:00 pm: 27th Feb, 6, 13, 20 March including a retreat (TBC)

How well do you do at living? We all want to be happy, and we try our best to lead fulfilling lives, yet we seem to stumble through life, constantly tripped up by hidden psychological forces as well as obstacles that appear to arise from outside ourselves. Is there a better way of living? Do we have the potential to live an extraordinary life? How do we go about living up to our fullest human potential? Using the ancient Tibetan Buddhist wisdom teachings that offer a vast and grand view of our lives, and perspectives from western psychology and neuroscience, Rob will help us answer these questions in this course, and will provide us with methods for living, dreaming and preparing for death that may help us develop the causes for happiness and peace in this lifetime.

Cost: R800 for full course, early bird discount of R200.00 for full course (by 26th Feb) including day retreat (concessions available, don’t let a lack of resources prevent you from attending. Please contact the office)

Rob Nairn is a Mindfulness and Buddhist teacher, and has lectured across South Africa and Zimbabwe to the UK and Europe. He was instrumental in setting up Mindfulness UK and the first Mindfulness MA at Aberdeen University, a course which now attracts hundreds of post-grad students each year. He was instrumental in bringing Mindfulness to South Africa and founded Mindfulness Africa in 2007. Rob was also responsible for the establishment of the Kagyu Samye Dzong centres in southern Africa under the guidance of Akong Tulku Rinpoche of Samye Ling Monastery in Scotland.

Rob’s background is in academia: Law, Psychology and Criminology. (He was the youngest ever Full Professor at UCT.) His books Tranquil Mind, Diamond Mind and Living, Dreaming and Dying have been translated into numerous languages and continue to be distributed widely. Rob’s particular interest is finding the meeting points between psychology, meditation and Tibetan Buddhism.